What you do to remove these barriers (including how you work with others such as e. G. Child/young person; family members; colleagues; external support agencies; other). Adaptations that are made to the environment, the activities, the working practice and resources. How you support pupils in the use of specialist aids and equipment. Working in partnership with pupils and others to review ad improve the activities and experiences of this child/young person. For the purpose of this unit I have created an CHEEP. CHEEP The imaginary child in my CHEEP will be known as ‘Child A’. Child Ass CHEEP Name of child: Child A Last Name

Address: 1 23, Some Street, Somewhere, NOT ROLL, Kent. D. O. B: 1 1. 03. 08 Name of school: Primary School INS No. :123 456 789 Language: English Ethnicity: White, British Parents/Careers names: Mother and Father Last Name contact NO. : 01234 567 890 Address: As Above Email: [email protected] Net Is this child/young person looked after? No Full Care Order, Interim Care Order or Section 20 N/A social worker WA Contact number N/A Email address N/A All about Child A Child A is not yet able to give his views directly, so this information has been provided by his parents and the professionals working with him.

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How have Child A and his family participated in the development of this plan? Child Ass parents attended a Family Meeting with EACH Caseworkers. Child A met with the Community Pediatrician and the Educational Psychologist as part of their respective assessments and observations of Child A. Child Ass parents have had regular contact with his current school. Child Ass story: Child A and his one older sister, Child B, all live at home with Mum and Dad. It was first noticed that Child A had additional needs when he started nursery, where he didn’t settle or mix with the other children.

Child A was diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (SAD) in 2011; he also experiences a lot of difficulties with anxiety. While there are some things that are known triggers for the anxiety, such as being touched, it is often not clear what has caused it. This means that some of Child Ass behavior, actions and reactions can also be inconsistent and unpredictable. (Reference K) Child Ass views interests and aspirations: Child A loves playing Mineshaft. Using the computer, especially playing games, as well as being something Child A enjoys doing, can help him to calm down.

He also loves drawing, especially dinosaurs. Child A likes to isolate himself hen distressed to help him calm down. At home he will go somewhere (such as his bedroom) where he knows no-one else will be. Child A gets on very well with his paternal grandfather, who is known as ‘Grasps’, he enjoys going on the bus with him, though he would not enjoy this with other people. Child A is very talkative with Grasps. Child A does not like to be touched by people, including his sister, but doesn’t mind being touched by Mum and Dad.

In order to reduce being touched, Child A will sit in the passenger seat of the car, while his sibling is in the back. Noise levels in the classroom are distressing or him, so he wears ear defenders. His distress at noise can lead to tantrums where he will scream and kick on the floor. (Reference K) The views of child Ass parents: Within the family, everyone “lets child A be child A”. This works. Mum and Dad both agree that helping child A manage his anxiety is really important, that this is necessary in order for him to then be able to access the curriculum and learn as effectively as he can.

Currently, his levels Of anxiety at school are so high that they appear to be preventing him from actually learning. Child A can be flexible, when his level of anxiety allows. The school have been supportive, and have tried everything they can, including some of Mum’s suggestions, to help Child A. Mum feels the school have done well with Child A and have done their very best to support him, but it is not working any more. Mum fears Child A will not cope going into Year 4, as he is not coping now.

Mum feels that his needs would be better met in a smaller class of children. Mum thinks that learning might work better for Child A if it is in smaller chunks over a period of time, that this could allow time and space for him to calm down and reduce his levels of anxiety. Mum and Dad just want hat is best for Child A. (Reference K) How to communicate with Child A and engage him in decision making: It’s always best to allow Child A time to calm down when he is distressed or anxious. It’s better to use simple words, phrases or sentences.

If he hasn’t understood, he can get frustrated, so rather than just repeating, it’s best to restructure the phrase or sentence in a simpler way. Visual cues can be helpful, but this is not consistent. He can sometimes verbalism his fears such as ‘go away, don’t want you’ – these are signs he is becoming anxious. Child Ass eye contact can be limited, and he does not like ewe or Strange people. (Reference K) Child Ass support network: Child A is primarily supported by his parents, but also has a very good relationship with his paternal grandfather.

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